Health

Blu Detox Protocol

Order protocol system here

Blu Detox Protocol

Fasting is a method of restricting food intake and has been practiced for thousands of years. Studies have shown that fasting has many benefits, such as helping to reduce chronic disease by stimulating autophagy. Autophagy is the process of breaking down and disassembling dysfunctional cellular components and recycling or regenerating cells to balance the body or reach homeostasis. Fasting is not suitable for everyone; therefore, you should consult your healthcare provider or doctor to ensure it is safe for you.

Depleting your body of important vitamins and minerals can be dangerous, which is why I do not believe in strict water only fasting. This detoxifying cleanse comes with herbals teas to keep nutrients in the body while continuously boosting the immune system to prevent feeling ill as your body detoxes.

The ideal fast is recommended for 48-72 hours. After your fast is complete, you should avoid eating a heavy or large meal. Break your fast with something light for the first day. Start with clean-eating and small portions. You may also incorporate lemon water throughout the day with your fast, and/or a glass of celery juice first thing in the morning.  Otherwise, the fast should only be limited to the provided tea blends and water. If you have any additional questions, please email me at info@mistibludream.com and please remember that this is not to cure, diagnose or treat disease. Medical disclaimers are located on each packet for legal purposes.

 

You will find three tea packets included in the Blu Detox Protocol:

  • Spring Cleaning is the detox blend that supports the immune system while helping your body to eliminate toxins. This blend is naturally loaded with antioxidants and vitamin C. Have a cup of this tea each day during your detox. You can drink it cold or hot.
  • Revival is an anti-inflammatory blend that helps reduce stress levels, supply your body with nutrients, improves hair and skin health, soothes aches and pains, and helps with digestion. You can drink it cold or hot.
  • Energizing Sprinkles is a greens mix. Typically you could put it in your smoothies, juices or muffin mix but for this fasting protocol, you will mix a spoonful in a cup of room temperature water (can be chilled). This gives you energy while alkalizing the body and also assisting in the detox process. The blend will balance your pH, flush out toxins, sharpen your mind and focus, and boost your energy, all while improving your mood and keeping your electrolytes balanced. This does contain a small amount of green tea so if you cannot have caffeine, please customize your detox by swapping it out for Healing Sprinkles. Healing Sprinkles is not a greens mix but has many nutrients, mood improvement qualities, and anti-inflammatory properties. This blend is usually best in hot water as a tea, with honey and coconut milk (and baked goods, smoothies, and coffee). However, additives and other ingredients are excluded during the fast.

*This protocol system comes with three packets, each providing enough product to last the full three day cleanse. This can also be ordered as a sampler to try the three blends without having to order full sizes.

SHOP!

 

 

Health

Unconsented Pelvic Exams

*Sharing my homework assignment with everyone because it matters and I always choose important topics.

Intro To Healthcare Assignment: Ethical Issue

Ethical issue: Performing unconsented pelvic exams on women while they are under anesthesia is legal in 45 states.

My Perspective:

Medical students are practicing pelvic exam while patients are under anesthesia. During Shawn Barnes’ third year in medical school, he was asked to and did perform pelvic exams during his obstetrician and gynecology training. Once anesthesia was administered, the attending physician or resident would ask Barnes to perform a pelvic exam for educational purposes.

When later voicing his opinion of this ethical conflict, Barnes learned that this was, in fact, a standard protocol to perform unconsented internal vaginal exams on unsuspecting ob/gyn patients. Many people outside of the medical field are shocked and horrified to learn that doctor-patient trust could be violated in this way.

Why wouldn’t the doctor or the hospital require consent? It has been nearly a decade since Shawn Barnes voiced his opinion and nearly thirty years since this topic has first been discussed and yet these exams still occur in 45 states, legally. Simply put, we need to end the practice of uninformed and unconsented internal vaginal exams.

I can’t help but wonder if I have ever had an unconsented pelvic exam during one of my many ob/gyn surgeries. Please contact your local government.

*Hawaii, California, Illinois, Virginia, and Oregon have outlawed the practice

Missouri
Office of Missouri Governor Michael L. Parson

P.O. Box 720
Jefferson City, MO 65102

Florida

Office of Governor Ron DeSantis

State of Florida

The Capitol

400 S. Monroe St.

Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001

Sources:

https://journals.lww.com/greenjournal/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=2012&issue=10000&article=00028&type=Citation

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bioe.12441

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/12592274/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/16206868/

https://medium.com/@holympus/its-time-to-completely-stop-unconsented-pelvic-examinations-cef80c38b334

Health, Unveiling Invisible Illnesses

What is Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome?

Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is an inherited heterogeneous group of thirteen subtypes in which abnormal collagen synthesis affects connective tissue: skin, bones, ligaments, blood vessels, organs and tissue. Collagen is a major structural component of the body. Danish dermatologist Edvard Ehlers recognized the condition in 1901. In 1908, a French physician named Henri-Alexandre Danlos suggested the features of the syndrome. Weak and structurally abnormal collagen may result in flexible and loose joints, poor wound healing, fragile blood vessels, ruptured or prolapsed organs, dysautonomia and many other various health conditions.

The inheritance patterns vary based on each subtype. Autosomal dominant inheritance means that just one copy of an altered gene can produce the disorder. For other subtypes, the disorder can be inherited from one affected parent and some even develop new gene mutations that occur with no family history. The gene mutation for COL1A2 can be found on chromosome seven, altering the collagen found in most connective tissue. This particular gene is associated with cardiac-valvular EDS, atypical Marfan Syndrome and Osteogenesis Imperfecta. There currently is no known gene linked to the most common subtype, hEDS; however, recent testing and research has been launched to discover the gene associated.

The launch collaborated with Ehlers-Danlos Society will collect enough data to gain more knowledge of this rarely diagnosed disorder. Different genes are associated with different subtypes and symptoms can range from mild to life threatening. 

For formal diagnosis, a referral to a geneticist is a start. There is test called the Beighton Scale, which has helped assess hypermobility since 1998. Medical history is also important for diagnosis. There is also a list of diagnosis criteria for each subtype that require a patient to meet a certain amount of history and symptoms. Vascular EDS can be potentially fatal, which makes proper diagnosis and subtype classification important.

Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is not curable but symptoms may be managed with a team of specialists. It is a systemic disorder, meaning that multiple systems may be affected. Many patients see a range of specialists such as pulmonology, electrophysiology, cardiology, gastroenterology, neurology, pain management and so on. Specialists involved depend on the patient’s specific symptomatic issues that are a result of the connective tissue disorder. 

The current statistics for the more common subtypes are 1 in 2,500 to 1 in 5,000. Some of the rarer types only have a handful of documented cases. However, recent clinical studies show that EDS is more common and not so much rare as it is rarely diagnosed. This makes awareness, education and advocacy so important, in order to better understand and diagnose this disorder. 

 

 

 

 

References:

 

The Ehlers-Danlos Society. What Are The Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes? Retrieved from https://www.ehlers-danlos.com/what-is-eds/

 

National Library of Medicine. (April 2019). Genetics Home Reference: Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. Retrieved from https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/ehlers-danlos-syndrome

 

Health, mental health

The Invisible Diaries Podcast and Show

I am so excited to announce the upcoming launch of a show with my dear friend Amber, called The Invisible Diaries! The show will be shedding light on invisible illnesses. We are going to interview guests as well.

If you are interested in being on our show, please emails us at theinvisiblediaries@gmail.com and introduce yourself.

Instagram and Facebook Daily Topics

  • Mental Health Monday – Mental health awareness, support and education
  • Teach Me Tuesday – Education, information and learning
  • Words of Wisdom Wednesday – Quotes and inspiration
  • Thankful Thursday – Focusing on the good and finding balance
  • Favorites Friday – Favorite things and product highlights

Stay tuned and follow us on social media for updates on our official launch!

mental health

30 Day Mental Health Challenge

Check off each day as you go. If you miss a day, go back to it and complete at the end.

Feel free to share any of your challenges and activities on Instagram with #30DayBlu

  • Day 1: Write a list of your goals for the month
  • Day 2: Put your headphones on and go on a 15 minute walk.
  • Day 3: Treat yourself! Whether it is a concert, hot bath, massage or ice cream… you deserve it.
  • Day 4: Write a letter to someone who hurt you and then burn it.
  • Day 5: No phone for the evening! Shut off your phone before dinner and don’t touch it till morning.
  • Day 6: Start a new book or continue reading the book that you haven’t finished yet.
  • Day 7: Compliment 3 complete strangers
  • Day 8: Plan a mini adventure for your next day off. Check out a nearby town. Go to a museum or garden, for example.
  • Day 9: Reach out to a person you have been out of touch with; ask them how they’ve been.
  • Day 10: Clean your closet and donate what you don’t use or wear anymore
  • Day 11: Try something new! Go to a yoga class or an art class.
  • Day 12: Look in the mirror and tell yourself 3 great things about yourself
  • Day 13: Cut something toxic out of your life. Examples: a bad habit, toxic relationship, sugar addiction.
  • Day 14: Health day! Smoothies, salads and clean eating. Focus on health and nutrition today.
  • Day 15: Spend 15 minutes stretching and focusing on breathing.
  • Day 16: Do something nice and unexpected for someone.
  • Day 17: Be present. Make eye contact all day, with each conversation you have. Even if it is the cashier at the grocery store. Be aware of your surroundings and listen.
  • Day 16: Get a jar and fill it with all the loose change you find throughout the day. Label it with your choice: vacation, anniversary, Christmas funds, new shoes, massage…
  • Day 17: No social media till noon! Check on your list of goals for the month or catch up on a day you missed.
  • Day 18: Learn something new. Spend 15 minutes reading or researching about an interesting topic.
  • Day 19: Art day! Create something: a drawing, poem, painting, or anything of your choice. Check Pinterest if you are drawing a blank.
  • Day 20: Think of something you have done that you regret or are ashamed of. Forgive yourself. You are human and we make mistakes and grow from them. Think about what you learned. Follow with a self-care activity.
  • Day 21: Send a card or letter to a good friend or family member.
  • Day 22: Clean your nightstand, wash your bedding and plan to go to bed early tonight. No tv or phone! Focus on breathing and visualize the ocean or mountains.
  • Day 23: Forgive someone who never apologized. Think about how you were hurt and let it go. You owe it to yourself, not them.
  • Day 24: Donate some items to the Humane Society, local food pantry or women’s shelter.
  • Day 25: Do something outside of your comfort zone.
  • Day 26: Make that doctors appointment you have been putting off… your annual check up, routine bloodwork or that follow up and never went to.
  • Day 27: Check on your strong friends. Ask them how they are doing, reach out and give them an opportunity to open up. Those who appear put together sometimes have silent battles.
  • Day 28: Clean your vehicle. If you don’t have a vehicle then clean your bathroom or office.
  • Day 29: Photo day! Take photos of throughout the day to show your perspective through your eyes, but in black and white. Get creative.
  • Day 30: Pay it forward
Healthy Food

Sweet Thai Chili Tacos

*Published in March 2019 issue of The Beachside Resident

What you will need:

  • Your choice of protein: chicken, shrimp, tofu or veggies
  • Corn tortillas
  • Sweet Thai chili sauce
  • Gluten-free soy sauce
  • Turmeric
  • Cashews
  • Fresh basil
  • Onion powder
  • Garlic powder
  • Honey (or maple if vegan)
  • Asian slaw mix
  • Sriracha
  • Ginger

Directions

Sauté your choice of protein. I chose a vegan chicken substitute. Add turmeric, onion and garlic powder, and gluten-free soy sauce in the pan, cooking on medium heat. In a separate pan, lightly toast your cashews. Put the toasted cashews aside and use the same pan to heat your tortillas. When your protein is cooked, deglaze the pan with Thai chili sauce.

Asian Slaw

You can use an asian slaw pre-mixed bag or make your own. I usually get the pre-made bags from the store and throw away the sauce. The sauces are loaded with corn syrup and I prefer my homemade spin. For my sauce, I mix a little ribbon of Sriracha, equal parts of honey or maple syrup, gluten-free soy sauce and a pinch of ginger. Mix everything together and set aside.

Putting it all together

First, place your warm tortillas on your plate or in a taco stand, and partially fill with your protein of choice. Top with asian slaw, toasted cashews and fresh basil.

Recommended sides

I love either jasmine rice, quinoa and kale, or fried rice, topped with black beans. I also enjoy serving mini vegetable spring rolls as a side. This dish is Mexican-Thai fusion so it is fun to get creative and blend two different cuisine styles into one delicious dish. Have fun and enjoy!

Health, mental health, Unveiling Invisible Illnesses

Rare Disease Day

It is Rare Disease Day so obviously I am jumping on this moment to raise awareness. I have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and a rare type, called cardiac-valvular EDS or cvEDS.

Hypermobility is very common with EDS. There are many, many other health issues that fall under the umbrella due to this collagen defect. Imagine your joints are like rubber, frequently popping out of place from even just a hug or rolling over in bed. Sometimes these joints stay out of place or wear down. It is a painful disease to many.

This does not only affect joints but can also affect your organs.

We are all different and we call ourselves Zebras because in the medical field, doctors and nurses are trained that when they hear hooves to look for horses not zebras. This mentality has caused me to go undiagnosed and medically neglected for my entire life, up until I had genetic testing last year. Despite my heart issues and frequent ER visits, being young and seemingly healthy has had me labeled as drug seeking or having anxiety attacks.

The reason why is because EDS and dysautonomia (dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system) does not show up on routine blood work. I have never done drugs, besides cannabis, and even after open heart surgery and a broken sternum I did not even finish my pain meds prescription. I have been treated as if I were an IV drug user, because in my area that is the only reason someone of my age would have this extent of damage to their heart. I am so incredibly thankful to now be taken seriously with a diagnosis, but it is bittersweet because this syndrome is progressive and for me, my heart is always at risk. In my recent echo, I have developed a dilated aortic root. This is beyond scary to me because EDS, especially cvEDS comes with aneurisms. Dealing with this type of diagnosis as well as chronic pain and illness is mentally exhausting.

I am passionate about awareness is because it took so fucking long to be heard. I suffered for so long not taking proper care of myself and not knowing the correct treatments. I have been called a hypochondriac by exes and have hidden behind a mask for years. I want others to know they are not alone and I want medical professionals to see us.

Health, mental health, Unveiling Invisible Illnesses

Waking Up in Pain

Mornings are hard. When you think of Sundays, you think of sleeping in and waking up to the sun finding it’s way to to you. You think of sitting up, a nice stretch and a moment to admire the open window sharing hints of a beautiful day.

The reality is that you wake up from pain. And you have woken up several times already but you hurt too much to go back to sleep and the sun is up now, so you may as well get out of bed. Lying in bed hurts. It isn’t this relaxing thing where you can leisurely sprawl out in bed and feel like you are on a cloud, melting into your mattress. No, you have to move because one position makes your tailbone go numb and another hurts your collarbone and lying on your stomach makes your back feel broken.

So, now you get up and everything pops back into place. Almost everything. Your left hand and lips are tingling and numb but it only last a few minutes. You walk to the bathroom, holding on to everything you pass for stability so that you don’t fall. Even when you sit down, reaching to wipe is excruciating and demoralizing. It breaks you just glimpsing into the future, wondering if are going to need help wiping your own ass one day. Then, as much as you want to crawl back into bed and melt into your significant other, you quietly walk out of the room so you can find something to do and walk off the pain of sleeping.

Your head is killing you and you are nauseous as if you are hungover. As you walk to the kitchen, everything fades away and you can’t see. Your body starts to feel fuzzy and go numb, just like before you pass out. You don’t typically fully pass out so you know you can just keep walking through it as long as you hold on the way there. You are a pro and have smiled and held conversations while on the brink of passing out but you know it passes and this is your norm.

When pain levels are high, your morale is low. Your dreams and ambition slide over to the back burner. Sometimes they even get put away into Tupperware to decay in the back, hidden behind the fruit. Sometimes the sunshine creeping in through the window looks so far away. But you just get through this. You hold on to the idea of your next good day, whenever that may be. You find hope in new remedies and whatever ways you can try to have control over your health. You find hope in the people who support you and your loved ones.

*On the pain scale of 1-10, I have never been under a five. My one is a five. I am not wanting sympathy but what I am wanting is to be honest about how I feel instead of hiding with an autopilot response of “I’m fine.” I want to raise awareness for people like me so they don’t feel alone, and for people without chronic pain so that they can understand their loved one or friend. We live in a world of sucking it up and smiling through the pain. We are suppressed and depressed with a bottled soul. It isn’t right. Be real and let others be real so they they aren’t lost and alone.