Health, Unveiling Invisible Illnesses

Unveiling Invisible Illnesses – Ménière’s Disease

I will never stop dreaming. My wanderlust will never die in me. I will never stop wanting my best life ever, no matter how sick I feel. -Leah

Ménière’s Disease is an inner ear disorder that causes episodes of vertigo. Triggers can be caused by stress, pressure changes, emotional distress, certain foods, physical fatigue, additional illnesses and too much salt in your diet. Tinnitus and hearing loss may become worse over time. You may have periods of time in remission or you may also experience continuous attacks. Attacks can appear without warning and can last hours, sometimes taking days to resolve completely. Unpredictable attacks may lead to anxiety and depression.

I interviewed Leah about her chronic and invisible illness. She is an incredibly positive woman who always fights for strength and courage through tough times and often looking at someone who seems poised and put together, we never see their emotional and physical battles. Leah shares her story with us.

What is your official diagnosis?

Ménière’s Disease. Treatment can help but there is no cure. It is a chronic lifelong autoimmune disease.

How has this affected your life? How about your mood?

Ménière’s Disease has affected my life in many ways. I have lost the majority of my hearing in my left ear and also have constant tinnitus, an annoying ringing in the ears. I have random and sudden onsets of severe vertigo that leads to nausea, vomiting, migraines, sweating, irregular heartbeat, sensitivity to light and sound and also sudden drop attacks. As a result, I have had to cut down to working part time which has been a financial strain, limit driving, change my diet and eliminate or lessen certain triggers such as stress, caffeine, alcohol and certain stores like Walmart.

Ménière’s Disease has affected my mood tremendously. Some days are better than others. I have a lot more anxiety and feelings of guilt than I have ever encountered in my life. I also struggle with adjustment issues. As a result, I’ve been seeing a therapist once a week for several months. It is very beneficial to my life and the lives of my family and loved ones.

At a glance, you look healthy. Would you say that people don’t quite understand the severity of your illness? How had this made certain aspects of your life difficult, such as career and relationships?

Absolutely! Friends and coworkers will often say “You look so healthy and beautiful, how could you possibly be so sick?”

I explain to them that taking care of my looks, whether it be styling my hair, wearing make up, or wearing a nice outfit, it helps my mood. I may feel awful but taking care of my physical features helps raise my self esteem when I’m having a bad health day. My illness has affected my career significantly. I have to work in a certain setting that will not induce an episode. Fortunately, I work in a medical setting and most of my coworkers are understanding. My illness hasn’t effected my personal relationships as much, as I am grateful to have very understanding a supportive friends and family. I do at times, however, feel guilty when I have to reschedule plans or cancel last minute due to feeling ill. Feeling like a burden to others has been something I have struggled with, but since I started seeing my therapist, I have learned how to manage and cope with those feelings.

What inspires you?

My family and my pursuit in enjoying all the adventures life has to offer is what inspires me. My children and family keep me strong and motivated to live a happy life. Even though I have this illness, I never ever let it stop me from trying new things, traveling, and adventuring!

What are 3 things you can’t live without?

1. I can’t live without my beautiful loving children, my supportive family and my compassionate friends.

2. Avocados

3. Star Wars

Favorite quote?

My favorite quote comes from The Dalai Lama –

Each of you should feel that you have great potential and that, with self-confidence and a little more effort, change really is possible if you want it. If you feel that your present way of life is unpleasant or has some difficulties, then don’t look at these negative things. See the positive side, the potential, and make an effort. ~ The Dalai Lama

What advice would you have for people newly diagnosed with your same illness?

My advice to those newly diagnosed with Meniere’s Disease would be to not give up on life. Just because there are certain things you have to limit or can’t do anymore doesn’t mean you can’t live a fulfilling life. Make adjustments to accommodate your life. Don’t ever feel like a burden! People who love and support you won’t feel this way. And lastly you are not alone nor invisible. Reach out to friends, family, groups that have advice on your illness and counseling. You can survive this!

*Something I’d like to add is that just like you and so many of us living daily with invisible illness, I don’t let the illness stop me from being a mom of two, working full time again now, and going to school full time, as well as trying to be a decent human being and live all the adventures that life has to offer. Even though it is tough, I want other MD sufferers to know it is possible to go for your dreams and achieve them.

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