Health, Healthy Food, Sweet Tooth

Sugar – The Silent Killer and a Low Glycemic List of Foods Best For You

Our blood sugar or glucose levels should be in the 74-100 range. Glucose enters the bloodstream then to your cells. Our pancreas produces a hormone called insulin, which regulates the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and protein. Chronic high glucose levels will create issues with your insulin levels.

Having high levels of blood sugar on a constant basis can damage your blood vessels, leading to atherosclerosis (the hardening of your blood vessels). In time, this can create the perfect environment for heart disease due to the damage of long term elevated glucose. Sugar can increase the risk of stroke or heart attacks due to ischemia, or lack of blood flow to an organ, just as bad as cholesterol and high blood pressure. Besides heart disease and stroke, the narrowing or hardening of blood vessels can also compromise other organs and cause issues such as kidney disease, erectile disfunction, vision issues, poor circulation, nerve damage, slow wound healing and a weakened immune system.

You can run around the gym and count calories all day, but what you put into your body DOES matter. Justifying your workout so that you can eat processed foods with high sugar content or artificial ingredients will not work long term. You may feel fine now and slim down but as you age, these issues will catch up to you.

Foods to avoid:

  • White potatoes
  • White rice
  • White bread
  • Sugar
  • Sports and energy drinks
  • Soda
  • Yogurt with sugar*
  • BBQ sauce*
  • Ketchup*
  • Marinara sauce*
  • Granola*
  • Flavored coffees
  • Sweet tea
  • Protein bars and cereal bars*
  • Canned fruit
  • Bottled or premade smoothies
  • Breakfast cereals*
  • Cocktail mixers

*Check the labels! These can still be good as long as they do not have a high sugar content.

Best option, low glycemic:

  • Green vegetables
  • Sugar-free yogurt
  • Raw carrots
  • Berries
  • Kidney beans
  • Chickpea
  • Lentils
  • Nuts
  • Sweet potato
  • Peas
  • Quinoa
  • Watermelon
  • Artichokes
  • Grapefruit
  • Peaches
  • Oranges
  • Grapes
  • Plums
  • Apples
  • Squash
  • Broccoli
  • Tomatoes
  • Corn tortillas

Maple syrup and local honey are great natural sweeteners and substitutes for sugar. Artificial sweeteners and even many natural sweeteners like Stevia are still very processed to the point of losing all natural value. Remember to read the labels and sugar content. We sometimes see products that are marketed as healthy as assume they are okay, but are often loaded with sugar.

Every day is a new day. Every hour is a new chance to start over. Many of us mess up and fall off the track, then stay there. Pick yourself back up, and start over. You are worth it. Your future self with thank you.

We are creatures of habit and you will change your habits and lifestyle if you stick to it. Prevent disease and future health issues by eating clean and keeping your body in balance.

Health, Unveiling Invisible Illnesses

Unveiling Invisible Illnesses – Type 1 Diabetes

Frazier has been a diabetic warrior since the age of 12. She is a young, vibrant woman with a fun personality and doesn’t let the illness define her, yet advocates for others and is making the effort to help younger generations on how to cope and live their lives. I interviewed Frazier and around that time she was in the hospital. She rides her sense of humor as a strength to keep her chin up during tough times. Support is everything! It’s not easy and it can be scary but it is important to be happy and take care of yourself.

What is your invisible illness?

Type one diabetes

When and how were you diagnosed?

I was 12 years old. I went in for a double ear infection, got lab work done and I was diagnosed with type one diabetes.

What were your struggles and fear after diagnosis?

At first I didnโ€™t fully grasp the full weight of my disease. Later, I realized how much work it was going to take. I was in denial for a very long time and I thought that ignoring it would make it go away.

Frazier is very involved with Florida Diabetes Camp. She was a camper from 2005-2010, then became a volunteer. She helps the kids learn how to manage diabetes and shows them that they can do anything that non diabetics can. She wears an insulin pump to help regulate her sugars on a daily basis. “I have to count the carbs that I eat, then give myself a dose of insulin to keep my sugar at a normal level. My blood sugar goal is between 80-130. It’s a balancing game that is super important. If I let it get of our control I can end up in the hospital with a DKA, diabetic ketoacidoais. Which is why I’m here now.” (hospital)

What advice do you have for anyone going through a new diagnosis?

Get a good support system. It is very important to have people in your corner. Also tell your friends and close people around you that you have this disease. One day they might save your life.

What are your goals and dreams in life?

I want to be a mom. I have always love kids, even to the point that I geared my education towards a career that includes children.

Three things you cannot live without:

Coffee, diabetes supplies, friends and family.

Favorite Quote:

“I have diabetes, diabetes does not have me.”