Health, Unveiling Invisible Illnesses

Holistic Vs. Modern Medicine

The ongoing argument forever continues as people debate which is better: holistic or natural medicine? Supplements vs. medications, surgery vs. a holistic approach. Which is the best? The seas part and divided we stand on either side, just like a political preference or religious choice. The sides argue with one another. il_794xN.2012082761_8020

As someone who owns an apothecary shop¬†that offers herbal tea, CBD, and other natural products, I can say that the natural approach is always a great start. However, I don’t strictly preach one side or the other. I believe in the balance of all things. Sure, too much of anything can be damaging but that also includes nutrients. Did you know there is a such thing as nutrient poisoning? Many people are quick to blame everything on lifestyle choices but nothing is ever a one-size-fits-all, including health. Eating a raw vegan plant-based diet or starting a yoga regime is not going to fix a congenital heart defect.

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Lifestyle choices can and will impact your health. There is no doubt about that. However, I am sick and tired of that being the sole blame of having health issues. Ableist behavior typically stems from a healthy-ish person who can’t relate or wrap their narrow mind around the idea of someone being chronically ill.

“Maybe if you started working out.”

“It’s probably just stress.”

“Have you tried ________?”

“You’re always complaining about something.”

“You’re a hypochondriac.”

“Have you tried keto?”

“Maybe it’s all in your head.”

“Just be positive.”

“Heal your childhood trauma.”

Thanks to modern medicine and advances in technology, my quality of life has improved drastically. I have a dual lead pacemaker and I take three heart medications. That’s right… I take pills. I am thankful for them. I also take supplements, vitamins, eat clean, and stay hydrated. I also get IV saline infusions in the summertime for hypovolemia to help with dysautonomia. I am thankful for my hysterectomy, pacemaker, four cardiac ablations, and open heart surgery. I tried the holistic approach but it’s not a cure for me. Don’t shame others for not following your views. I am the balance of both worlds with medicine, herbs, surgery, and supplements. Just because I take medicine does not mean I am not taking responsibility of my health.

Stop pill shaming. This toxic berate makes vulnerable people feel shame and guilt about their health as if they aren’t trying hard enough or that it’s their fault. I am sick of the words: truths, journey, healing. Not everyone gets to heal. Some of us are just trying to survive. I commend those who can make a few lifestyle choices and hit the gym to become a new person. However, the shoe that fits that person, pinches another.

Just be open to what you don’t understand. Be supportive. Keep your unsolicited opinions to yourself.

 

Health, Unveiling Invisible Illnesses

Invisible Illnesses Unveiled- Cervical Cancer and Endometriosis

This photo was taken 2 weeks after I had a conization, a cone-shaped piece of tissue, removed from the cervix. Before that procedure, I had 5 biopsies on my cervix showing precancerous dysplasia CIN3.

A week before this photo was taken, I was told I had cervical cancer. I had micro invasions in the margins where my cone biopsy was taken. Sometimes this procedure removes the bad cells and you are done. However, occasionally the margins are still positive and further treatment is required.

When I walked into the office, having fevers and recovering from the procedure, I came in to follow up and get answers from the pathology. I sat down in her office, distracted by the vibrant decor… black, white and silver glam office, reminding me of a salon or just a really girly office. My nervous mind wandering. What should I do for the rest of the day? Where should I get lunch?

“You have cancer. The margins are positive and this all happened so fast, meaning that it is super aggressive. The area of the micro invasions are up closer to your uterus and blood vessels so I am also worried about it spreading. You will need to see an oncologist for a hysterectomy and possibly further treatment.”

I steered my gaze from the sparking decor and looked her in the eyes, eyes of concern and dread for giving bad news to me every time I see her. My thoughts are whirling as I think about how this can’t possibly be real. My vision blurs as tears welt up in disbelief and fear. I have three kids and an amazing husband that I adore. I have a compromised heart that can’t handle much and still struggle to get my health under control… How can I go through this?

The appointment felt like a break up as I got passed along to a male doctor I have never met, an hour away after finally trusting this doctor and an appointment a couple weeks later, which felt like eternity.

Just before this photo was taken, my husband and I got bikes to ride on the beach. I was feeling great and it was beautiful. I still was processing the news but made the decision to remain calm and patient. We were on a trip in Miami South Beach. After riding the bikes for only a few minutes, I got dizzy and clammy. “Sorry to cut this short, babe, but I don’t feel well and I want to go back to the room.”

My sweet, understanding husband got the bikes returned and we went to our room on the 10th floor with a gorgeous view. A few hours later, I started hemorrhaging. I ended up in the Miami ER for 7 hours, finally being discharged so that we could return home and see my doctor.

Now, as I write this, I am almost two weeks post op from my hysterectomy and my pathology was cleared for no further treatment and I am cancer free. Though I did have to go back to the hospital for two broad spectrum IV antibiotics for two days, I am doing well.

I would not wish this roller coaster on anyone but I am so grateful it wasn’t worse. It could have been worse. I could be still fighting. Before I came in for my one week hysterectomy post op appointment, I said to myself, “If there is more, I am done. I will live my life happy and will not do any further treatment or put my heart through anything more.” I was so lucky. I am so lucky and grateful.

I will say, as someone who suffered from severe endometriosis most of my life, close to two decades, I wish I had a hysterectomy sooner. I put it off for so long, worried about everyone’s opinions and fears. I am excited to start this new chapter of my life of no suffering. I want to buy white pants to celebrate! Two weeks of every month will be mine again, not lost in bed with migraines, severe pain, chest tightness, fevers, fatigue, nausea, IBS and depression.

If you have severe endometriosis, a hysterectomy is nothing but just one last period cramp. You’ll do fine!