Health, Unveiling Invisible Illnesses

Invisible Illnesses Unveiled- Cervical Cancer and Endometriosis

This photo was taken 2 weeks after I had a conization, a cone-shaped piece of tissue, removed from the cervix. Before that procedure, I had 5 biopsies on my cervix showing precancerous dysplasia CIN3.

A week before this photo was taken, I was told I had cervical cancer. I had micro invasions in the margins where my cone biopsy was taken. Sometimes this procedure removes the bad cells and you are done. However, occasionally the margins are still positive and further treatment is required.

When I walked into the office, having fevers and recovering from the procedure, I came in to follow up and get answers from the pathology. I sat down in her office, distracted by the vibrant decor… black, white and silver glam office, reminding me of a salon or just a really girly office. My nervous mind wandering. What should I do for the rest of the day? Where should I get lunch?

“You have cancer. The margins are positive and this all happened so fast, meaning that it is super aggressive. The area of the micro invasions are up closer to your uterus and blood vessels so I am also worried about it spreading. You will need to see an oncologist for a hysterectomy and possibly further treatment.”

I steered my gaze from the sparking decor and looked her in the eyes, eyes of concern and dread for giving bad news to me every time I see her. My thoughts are whirling as I think about how this can’t possibly be real. My vision blurs as tears welt up in disbelief and fear. I have three kids and an amazing husband that I adore. I have a compromised heart that can’t handle much and still struggle to get my health under control… How can I go through this?

The appointment felt like a break up as I got passed along to a male doctor I have never met, an hour away after finally trusting this doctor and an appointment a couple weeks later, which felt like eternity.

Just before this photo was taken, my husband and I got bikes to ride on the beach. I was feeling great and it was beautiful. I still was processing the news but made the decision to remain calm and patient. We were on a trip in Miami South Beach. After riding the bikes for only a few minutes, I got dizzy and clammy. “Sorry to cut this short, babe, but I don’t feel well and I want to go back to the room.”

My sweet, understanding husband got the bikes returned and we went to our room on the 10th floor with a gorgeous view. A few hours later, I started hemorrhaging. I ended up in the Miami ER for 7 hours, finally being discharged so that we could return home and see my doctor.

Now, as I write this, I am almost two weeks post op from my hysterectomy and my pathology was cleared for no further treatment and I am cancer free. Though I did have to go back to the hospital for two broad spectrum IV antibiotics for two days, I am doing well.

I would not wish this roller coaster on anyone but I am so grateful it wasn’t worse. It could have been worse. I could be still fighting. Before I came in for my one week hysterectomy post op appointment, I said to myself, “If there is more, I am done. I will live my life happy and will not do any further treatment or put my heart through anything more.” I was so lucky. I am so lucky and grateful.

I will say, as someone who suffered from severe endometriosis most of my life, close to two decades, I wish I had a hysterectomy sooner. I put it off for so long, worried about everyone’s opinions and fears. I am excited to start this new chapter of my life of no suffering. I want to buy white pants to celebrate! Two weeks of every month will be mine again, not lost in bed with migraines, severe pain, chest tightness, fevers, fatigue, nausea, IBS and depression.

If you have severe endometriosis, a hysterectomy is nothing but just one last period cramp. You’ll do fine!

Health, Unveiling Invisible Illnesses

Unveiling Invisible Illnesses – Endometriosis

Laura Kay Halcom from Rockledge, Florida is 1 of 10 who struggle with endometriosis, a painful disorder in which the tissue that grows on the lining of your uterus spreads to other organs like the fallopian tubes and ovaries. With no way to exit the body like normal menstruation, the tissue becomes trapped and causes pain, scaring, adhesions and fertility problems.

Endometriosis is difficult to diagnose without an invasive procedure, a laparoscopy. Often times it will be misdiagnosed with IBS or deemed psychological. Symptoms can range based on severity but can cause nausea, low grade fevers, heavy bleeding, lower back pain, pelvic pain, painful intercourse, painful bowel movements and fatigue.

Treatment usually starts with birth control hormones to try to regulate your cycle but unfortunately, some women are very sensitive to the hormones and don’t always respond to that treatment. Another option is an endometrial ablation, but it is not always suggested if you plan to have children. A hysterectomy is a final option but there are studies that it still is no cure and it is a rough surgery. If your endometrial tissue grows onto other organs, removing the uterus is not going to help. There are studies that nutrition can play a big role. An anti-inflammatory diet can help minimize symptoms.

Avoiding gluten, red meat, sugar, caffeine and alcohol can help alleviate symptoms and inflammation. Having a well-balanced diet full of nutrients, antioxidants, fatty acids and iron rich foods is important. Turmeric is a natural anti-inflammatory compound that you can take as capsules or sprinkle on your food. Having plenty of rest, staying hydrated and support will be your best friend for this diagnosis.

Meet Laura

What is your invisible illness?

Endometriosis, Depression, Anxiety

When and how were you diagnosed?

Endo: June 2017 by laparoscopic surgery. It took 12 years and dozens of tests for me to be diagnosed. I have had anxiety & depression since I was 16.

What were your struggles and fear after diagnosis?

There is no known cause, and no cure. Now, the treatments of birth control and antidepressants are just making things worse. I also fear infertility.

What advice do you have for anyone going through a new diagnosis?

Be patient with yourself. Keep records of everything. Find your community of people struggling with what you are fighting. Talk about it. Educate yourself so that you can educate others.

What are your goals and dreams in life?

My goal is to finish my business degree. I want to be an educator and an entertainer. I dream of my own business, where I can express myself through art, music, and nature. I dream of adventure in far away places.

Three things you cannot live without: Sunshine, hugs, and my heating pad!

Favorite Quote:

“What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?”

Endo Warrior Shirt